Motor G

Android is currently the king of the smartphone landscape in terms of market share. The range of price brackets it’s available in and the sheer amount of customizability that it provides to the user is second to none.

Android 4.4 KitKat

Google just pulled the covers off its latest flagship smartphone – the Nexus 5. It was possibly one of the worst kept secrets of the past year, and we pretty much knew what to expect from it months before the big unveil. It has top of the line specifications, at an amazing price. What also launched with the Nexus 5 though, was Android 4.4 KitKat. Now, this is probably the most significant upgrade to android since 4.0 ICS, but it hasn’t really received that much attention from the press.

Android hasn’t really offered the best user experience on low end devices

One of the key features of Android 4.4 is that it has very low memory requirements- it needs only about 512 megabytes of RAM to run smoothly, if the spokespeople at Google are to be believed. This is perhaps one of the most important improvements to Android, as for the longest time, android hasn’t really offered the best user experience on low end devices.

It is often said that to get the best user experience on an Android, you need the highest end device possible. The rise of Android as the operating system of choice has also seen a dramatic increase in processing power, amongst other heightened specifications over the years. Flagship devices always get the top of the line specs, the latest updates, and the best developer support. It’s a different story for low end devices though. They have ordinary or below average specs, but are loaded with the same amount of “features” that result into a below par, laggy experience.

Nokia Lumia 520

The Moto G could be Android’ 520

On the other hand, however, we have the Lumia lineup. Most notably, the Lumia 520. It has the same robust design language, in a smaller form factor and has modest specifications. Yet it provides the same smooth and lag-free user experience, at a very low price. The combination of a great user experience and a killer price makes the Lumia 520 one of the most popular Windows Phone devices ever.

Low end droids have always been associated with terrible performance up till now. Motorola just announced their Moto G, a sub $200 device with specifications any modern consumer would term as strictly “mid range”. Why then, do I think that this smartphone could be Android’s 520?

MotoG

Will the Motorola G Change Things?

The Moto X was widely lauded by tech journalists worldwide for its clean user interface, its brilliantly useful feature set and most of all its great performance. Motorola, under the umbrella of Google, designed a very good product- with a slightly unreasonable price tag. They aim to change that however- with the new Moto G. It won’t be unfair to expect a similar level of performance from the Moto G therefore, as the Moto X.

As far as Android goes, there’s a real lack of a compelling low end offering that has the same buttery smooth performance the high end devices enjoy. The Moto G therefore, could be the harbinger of this new revolution.

What do you think? Do you think the Moto G will truly be the amazing low-end android experience everyone’s been yearning for? Or will it fall in line with the scores of dull and sluggish androids out there? Let us know in the comments!

Dushyant Shrikhande the author

Dushyant is a technophile. He's an android aficionado, and loves playing videogames. He loves writing and hopes to be a tech journalist. (Seriously, he dreams of getting review units.) See him rant and occasionally tweet about tech here.

7 comments
Omkar Sathe
Omkar Sathe

There are no questions about the capabilites of Moto G in the performance department.. KitKat runs smooth as silk on my galaxy s2 even without ART.. So if the two year old hardware can do it, so can the Snapdragon 400 powered Moto G.. It'll do great in (ART + Low RAM mode) combi and TRIM will make sure the speed is retained for a longer than normal time period.. It's also interesting to note that Google recently completed the acquisition of French start-up FlexyCore which is best known for its Android performance enhancement solution droidBooster, so it's safe to assume that Moto G will also benefit from this deal.. In the end, it all comes down to pricing.. The fact that Google will launch Moto G in usa AND INDIA at the same time does make me happy but if it's gonna be a repeat telecast of nexus 5 in terms of PRICING (21.5K in US vs 29K in India for the same model), then I guess many of us will be disappointed as Lumia 520 is available as cheap as 7.5K while WP flagship in the country retails for about 42K.. Come on Google SURPRISE US!

Arjun Gujar
Arjun Gujar

True that....plus it beats S3 in antutu!

Ashish
Ashish

Surely, the low end androids don't do good. You can certainly call the moto G the Android 520, but unfortunately not the galaxy Y. Android needs to favour the low end devices better

JooheeShherma
JooheeShherma

After using it for some while, even the 520 lags. A nice read though, informative and elaborate.

Dushyant
Dushyant

@omkarsathe92 Yes, for sure, There should be some parity as far as pricing is concerned. There's always a price differential due to import duties and such, but the stark price differential we are seeing these days really goes to show that major OEMs don't really care as much about India as they do the USA. It's sad considering this is the 2nd largest smartphone market in the world.

Also, the Moto G marks the return of Motorola to India. The pricing, therefore, takes an even greater importance than in a normal scenario. Consumers have a negative perception of Motorola after they pulled out of India, stopping services completely. So this can mark the beginning of a new phase for motorola in that respect.

All in all, the Moto G is definitely a very important device, and yes, we're all hoping for google to surprise us!! 

Dushyant
Dushyant

@JooheeShherma well, lag is inevitable in a device after a point of time, as the more apps you install and run on a device, the more memory and RAM they take up, and that results in lag. What I am talking about is the user experience right out of the box. That for all intents and purposes, MUST be snappy and lag free. Pn low end devices that's not always the case.